Brain-Eating Infection And Neti Pot

Nasal irrigation (also called nasal lavage, nasal toilet, or nasal douche) is a personal hygiene practice in which the nasal cavity is washed to flush out mucus and debris from the nose and sinuses. It has been effectively proven that the daily practice of nasal irrigation helps control sinus episodes. Some doctors recommend nasal irrigation with a neti pot for their patients who have undergone sinus surgery. It helps to clear away the crusts in the nasal passages.  Many people use it to flush out pollutants and allergens.

Neti Kriya Neti Pot

In this method, sterilized and lukewarm isotonic salt water is poured into one nostril, so that it leaves through the other. This is then repeated on the other side, and the nose is dried by breathing rapidly.

According to an article published by the USA today in 2018, a Seattle woman recently died from a very rare brain-eating amoebic infection called Balamuthia mandrillaris. And all signs are pointing to her neti pot as the cause of that exceedingly rare deadly infection.

The report, published in the International Journal of Infectious Diseases, states the case of a 69-year-old female who presented with a chronic nasal skin rash, new-onset focal seizure, and a cerebral ring-enhancing lesion after a year of improper nasal irrigation. Despite aggressive and novel anti-amoebic treatment, she died as a result of a Balamuthia mandrillaris brain infection.

 

Balamuthia mandrillaris

Balamuthia mandrillaris is a free-living ameba (a single-celled living organism) naturally found in the environment. Balamuthia can cause a rare* and serious infection of the brain called granulomatous amebic encephalitis (GAE). Photo Credit CDC.gov

 

Now the question arises, should we stop using neti pots?

neti kriya neti pot

 

The Answer Is No, Here is why, because the doctor and FDA still approve it. Of course, you’ll have to follow some guidelines and keeps measures of things you do.

In this article by Healthline.com, You can find here a step-by-step procedure on how to perform neti kriya. Follow the instructions and stay safe.

Reference:

  • https://belatina.com/how-not-to-get-a-brain-eating-infection-from-your-neti-pot-this-winter/
  • https://www.healthline.com/health/how-to-use-a-neti-pot#safety-tips 
  • https://www.ijidonline.com/article/S1201-9712(18)34525-9/pdf

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